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albums you should own

Rock, reggae, r'n'b si orice alt gen muzical despre care simtiti nevoia sa discutati ... pe masura ce discutiile se vor segrega probabil vor aparea noi subforumuri

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Black Uhuru - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1981)

Postby sunrah » Thu Jul 24, 2008 3:19 pm

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Genre: Reggae

1 Shine Eye Gal (7:36)
Producer - Delroy Witter
2 Leaving To Zion (5:30)
3 General Penitentiary (5:32)
4 Guess Who's Coming To Dinner (6:18)
5 Abortion (7:25)
6 Natural Reggae Beat (8:12)
7 Plastic Smile (7:10)

Here's an example of really good reggae release. I would give it 5 stars except I have to rate it against my own opinions about reggae. I can listen to this cd all day and I love it. Guess Who's Coming to Dinner is a great song as are the other 6 songs on the cd. Why only 3 stars? Easy...it is not MY favorite. I think that a roots reggae novice would probably shy away from this release because the only thing by which to measure reggae might be Bob Marley. Bob is undeniably more on the mainstream in the world of reggae and a bit easier to listen to if you don't have an ear for reggae roots. With that said Black Uhuru will add flavor to your tastes in roots reggae and this release will make you happy you added the extra spice. I would recommend that you start with the ULTIMATE COLLECTION if you are just beginning to venture past Bob.

For those of you who understand roots a bit better...Pick this one up. It will rank high on your list of roots releases. I, for one, just love to hear this band's take on roots reggae. Just had a thought...This was released in 1981 which shows how timeless reggae is really! Can't say that about most 80's music. One Love!


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Dinosaur Jr. - You're Living All Over Me (1987)

Postby sunrah » Fri Jul 25, 2008 10:48 am

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Genre: Indie Rock

1 Little Fury Things 3:06
2 Kracked 2:50
3 Sludgefeast 5:17
4 The Lung 3:51
5 Raisans 3:50
6 Tarpit 4:36
7 In a Jar 3:28
8 Lose 3:11
9 Poledo 5:43
10 Show Me the Way 3:49

Dinosaur Jr. has always been in tune (no godawful music pun intended) with teenage malaise, but You’re Living All Over Me is the greatest teenager album of all time, not to mention Dino’s personal best, probably for that very reason. You’re probably thinking, what makes it the greatest teenager album ever? And isn’t that distinction artificial and meaningless anyway?

Well first off, of course it’s meaningless and arbitrary but worthless commendations are the very bread and butter of music criticism. It’s how critics (and aspiring critics) fool themselves into thinking they have actual power. And as for the important question, you know those teenagers who think that no one understands them? They have not heard this record.

Just like Pete Townsend, John Entwistle, Keith Moon and Roger Daltrey 20-something odd years before them, J Mascis, Lou Barlow and Murph were making pissed-off, despondent, hopelessly horny music. But unlike The Who, they weren’t grandly conceptual and expansive; The Junior just wanted to make as much noise with as few instruments as possible. Would Pete Townsend ever write a song that is pretty much a couple guitar solos occasionally interrupted by a two-line chorus? Well J Mascis did, and it’s called The Lung and it is fucking awesome.

Granted, Dino’s kind-of self-titled debut yielded them the greatest song they would ever write (the almighty self-deprecation of Forget The Swan) and it showed a lot of promise; they didn’t really have a lot of expectations to live up to with Living, but I’ll be damned if they didn’t rock the bejesus off of it anyway. Little Fury Things (pronounced “furry”) sets the pant-shitting tone with distorted guitar and muffled, agitated voices (provided by Lee Ranaldo) shrieking questions which lead into J’s mumbles about wildlife creatures and failing to get a girl.

A girl, or lack thereof, is the dominant lyrical theme throughout these 40 minutes (the musical one being, of course, a personified “fuck this motherfucking shit”). Raisins - perhaps the album’s best song - explores the simultaneous anger, arousal, depression and awkwardness that accompanies running into an old flame again and again (a common problem throughout the hallways of high schools). J vents his anger by informing this girl that “I know what you did to me/I know what you did was wrong” and that “your life is to torture me” but he seems, in regular teenage fashion, to be unable to get over her because she’ll “have to decide the fate of my sanity.” In a Jar displays the skepticism and paranoia of the socially downtrodden when a girl actually likes them, and Kracked implores that she should “come and set me free.” The point of many of the “love” songs on Living seems to be that while relationships tend to end horribly leaving scars, you’ll keep going back because it sure beats being alone.

That’s all the lyrical interpretation you’ll get from me, folks - this isn’t Dylan; the songs are plenty decipherable. Besides, when listening to this record, lyrics are really secondary. The thing that jumps out you is J beating the shit out of his Fender, which graciously returns the favor by beating the shit out of your ear drums.

Oh and we should not forget Lou Barlow’s two songwriting credits, Lose and Poledo - all told it’s about 9 minutes of pure, unadulterated self-loathing (“I can't believe I was chosen to exist/'Cause only Jesus Christ can slit his wrists”)…well, okay, “unadulterated” is the wrong word for Poledo. One half is Lou waxing despairingly while playing ukulele and the other is feedback, sound collages and shrieks.

Poledo is significant because it shows a radical difference in the songs written by Mascis and those written by Barlow. It would seem obvious to people listening to that in 1987 that this probably wasn’t going to last. The Who broke up after a long tenure due to Townsend’s writer’s block, Dino broke up 3 years after their debut because of too much writing. They got back together recently and released the majorly okay Beyond, But it seems likely that this, too, will pass.

We live in an indieverse currently run by the likes of Bright Eyes and Of Montreal, and many of those bands I like, but it’s good every once in awhile, or as often as humanly possible, to lose yourself in riffs, solos and other, high quality musical sludge.


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Massive Attack - Blue Lines (1991)

Postby sunrah » Sat Jul 26, 2008 6:24 pm

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Genre: Trip Hop

1 Safe From Harm 5:18
2 One Love 4:48
3 Blue Lines 4:21
4 Be Thankful for What You've Got 4:09
5 Five Man Army 6:04
6 Unfinished Sympathy 5:08
7 Daydreaming 4:14
8 Lately 4:26
9 Hymn of the Big Wheel 6:37

The first masterpiece of what was only termed trip-hop much later, Blue Lines filtered American hip-hop through the lens of British club culture, a stylish, nocturnal sense of scene that encompassed music from rare groove to dub to dance. The album balances dark, diva-led club jams along the lines of Soul II Soul with some of the best British rap (vocals and production) heard up to that point, occasionally on the same track. The opener "Safe From Harm" is the best example, with diva vocalist Shara Nelson trading off lines with the group's own monotone (yet effective) rapping. Even more than hip-hop or dance, however, dub is the big touchstone on Blue Lines. Most of the productions aren't quite as earthy as you'd expect, but the influence is palpable in the atmospherics of the songs, like the faraway electric piano on "One Love" (with beautiful vocals from the near-legendary Horace Andy). One track, "Five Man Army," makes the dub inspiration explicit, with a clattering percussion line, moderate reverb on the guitar and drums, and Andy's exquisite falsetto flitting over the chorus. Blue Lines isn't all darkness, either — "Be Thankful for What You've Got" is quite close to the smooth soul tune conjured by its title, and "Unfinished Sympathy" — the group's first classic production — is a tremendously moving fusion of up-tempo hip-hop and dancefloor jam with slow-moving, syrupy strings. Flaunting both their range and their tremendously evocative productions, Massive Attack recorded one of the best dance albums of all time.


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The Gun Club - Fire Of Love

Postby sunrah » Sat Jul 26, 2008 6:30 pm

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Genre: Rock

1. Sex Beat
2. Preaching The Blues
3. Promise Me
4. She's Like Heroin To Me
5. For The Love Of Ivy
6. Fire Spirit
7. Ghost On The Highway
8. Jack On Fire
9. Black Train
10. Cool Drink Of Water
11. Goodbye Johnny

Gun Club manages to melt punk rage, blues-drenched despair and schizophrenic psychobilly on their unforgettable, fantastic debut. Drived by Jeffrey Lee Pierce sneaky, eerie voodoo-howls, the wailing, bleak, storming up tempo guitar of Ward Dotson and the fierce manic beat of Rob Ritter-Terry Graham rhythm section, the band delivered their songs - haunting tales of sex, terror, damnation, violence & desperate love - with harsh, passionate abandon. Pierce's career was short and tragic, but he had the firepower to lead this fantastic combo through the recording of an album of timelessly roughshod and unruly psycho-punk-blues, perhaps the first - and easily the best - of its kind. "Fire of Love" is bona-fide rock'n'roll bliss, an album that defies time idyosincrasies and music ephemeral fashions.


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Postby sunrah » Sat Jul 26, 2008 6:46 pm

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Genre: Rock

1 The Beginning And The End (8:01)
2 The Other (7:15)
3 False Light (7:43)
4 Carry (6:46)
5 Untitled (2:05)
6 Maritime (3:03)
7 Weight (10:47)
8 From Sinking (8:24)
9 Hym (9:14)

Oceanic is the next logical step for Isis after the ugly, grandiose Celestial, the Aaron Turner-led outfit's second full-length looking simultaneously inward and outward, reaching into the nether regions of outer space while still keeping its feet firmly earthbound. Yes, it's an ambitious record, one that isn't immediately consumed and digested -- rather, it consumes and digests the listener with grand and hypnotic waves of sound. Songs blur together as aggressive, post-hardcore guitar riffery trades with lengthy, meditative bouts of electronic exploration, a technique that would result in plodding, pretentious mush in less capable hands. Instead, Oceanic successfully mirrors the dense, unimaginable power of its namesake, combining the minimalist metallic art of Godflesh with the bipolar mood swings and Black Sabbath muscle of West Coast brethren Neurosis. Turner's deathcore growl-shouts serve to puncture the instrumental tension that balloons slowly and painstakingly inflates throughout the album's 63 minutes, with ex-Dirt Merchants singer Maria Christopher occasionally drifting hazily into the arrangements. "Weight," at nearly 11 minutes, doesn't necessarily move as much as it evolves toward its goal, starting with lazy, but purposeful, melodic whale songs before logically concluding with Christopher's repetitive dub vocal and a droning organ suggesting spiritual rebirth. OnlyIsis could get away with writing hardcore hymns about the inevitability of elemental forces and pull it off with such conviction and attention to detail. The album may initially seem to exist in hazy head space, but clarity comes with further submergence, assuming you're willing to lay back and float, letting the water take you into both conscious and subconscious realms. Oceanic is a masterfully complex symphony of majestic noise and melody, an all-consuming trip into the earth and mind that defies genre and, often, description -- simply put, a triumph.


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sunti multi/e cu numele ISIS, pana si in rap, eh, ei's rockeri :lol:
n-am ascultat prea mult rock din deceniul asta, dar albumul asta mi-e preferat in acest moment.
exista si un cd cu remixes/reinterpretations care e genial si-o sa-l urc cu proxima ocazie, numai sa-l gasesc :) piesa 7 varianta lui mike patton la "maritime" e mindblowin'; daca n-ati auzit de patton, desi ma indoiesc, a fost asociat cu o droaie: Faith No More, Mr. Bungle, Fantômas, Tomahawk, Peeping Tom, Lovage, John Zorn, Kaada/Patton, Dillinger Escape Plan, Hemophiliac, Maldoror, General Patton vs. The X-Ecutioners. voi continua cu mr. bungle si fantomas (chiar daca's mai noi).
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Mr. Bungle - California (1999)

Postby sunrah » Sat Jul 26, 2008 6:57 pm

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Genre: Experimental/Pop/Rock

1 Sweet Charity 5:05
2 None of Them Knew They Were Robots 6:03
3 Retrovertigo 4:59
4 The Air-Conditioned Nightmare 3:55
5 Ars Moriendi 4:10
6 Pink Cigarette 4:55
7 Golem II: The Bionic Vapour Boy 3:34
8 The Holy Filament 4:04
9 Vanity Fair 2:58
10 Goodbye Sober Day 4:29

Four years after Disco Volante, Mr. Bungle returns with California, which immediately distinguishes itself from its predecessors — it's probably their most heavily orchestrated record to date and their most melodic overall, as well as the least dependent on rock styles. That's certainly not to imply that this is a tame or immediately accessible record, nor that Mr. Bungle has suddenly gone sane. There is a stronger lounge-music orientation to the group's trademark rapid-fire genre-hopping; we hear more pop, swing, rockabilly, country & western, bossa nova, Hawaiian and Middle Eastern music, jazz, Zappa-esque doo wop, arty funk, post-rock, space-age pop, spaghetti-Western music, warped circus melodies, and even dramatic pseudo-new age, plus just a smidgen of heavy metal. Sure, some of those sounds have appeared on Mr. Bungle records past, but the difference this time is the focus with which the band deploys its arsenal. California is their most concise album to date, clocking in at around 45 minutes; plus, while the song structures are far from traditional, they're edging more in that direction and that greatly helps the listener in making sense of the often random-sounding juxtapositions of musical genres (assuming, of course, that you're supposed to even try to make sense of them). As with any Mr. Bungle album, California requires at least a few listens to pull together, but its particular brand of schizophrenia isn't nearly as impenetrable as that of Disco Volante, even if it will still make you marvel at the fact that such a defiantly odd, uncommercial band recorded for Warner Bros.


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Fantomas - The Director's Cut (2001)

Postby sunrah » Sat Jul 26, 2008 7:05 pm

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Genre: Electronic, Rock

1 The Godfather (2:45)
2 Der Golem (2:37)
3 Experiment In Terror (2:39)
4 One Step Beyond (2:57)
5 Night Of The Hunter (Remix) (0:57)
6 Cape Fear (1:47)
7 Rosemary's Baby (3:19)
8 The Devil Rides Out (Remix) (1:37)
9 Spider Baby (2:25)
10 The Omen (Ave Satani) (1:48)
11 Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer (3:07)
12 Vendetta (1:58)
13 Untitled (0:03)
14 Investigation Of A Citizen Above Suspicion (3:59)
15 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (3:27)
16 Charade (3:03)

Film music and the artier end of the rock spectrum have enjoyed a slightly bent connection since the early '80s, when the noir-savvy California new wavers of Wall of Voodoo made clear Ennio Morricone's influence on their work. Fantomas's second album, The Director's Cut, is in that somewhat playful spirit. The all-star ensemble--ex-Faith No More frontman Mike Patton with members of Slayer, the Melvins, and Patton's Mr. Bungle--adapts disturbing (or at least spooky) themes by Bernard Herrmann, Henry Mancini, Morricone, and others. The bruising but often campy (there is no track 13) result works more often than you'd expect; Nino Rota's Godfather and Harry Lubin's (TV) One Step Beyond excerpts are put through more than effective paces. It's clear that, despite the occasional (inadvertent?) Iron Maiden homage, Patton and friends have no interest in keeping a straight face on this. That's fine, but Patton's goofy lyrical interjections on several of these tunes turns them into not-very-funny cartoons. Still, it's the rare sympathetic listener who won't be driven to check out obscure flicks like Der Golem and The Devil Rides Out.


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The Cure - Disintegration

Postby sunrah » Sun Jul 27, 2008 12:37 pm

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Genre: Rock

1 Plainsong 5:15
2 Pictures of You 7:28
3 Closedown 4:20
4 Lovesong 3:30
5 Last Dance 4:47
6 Lullaby 4:10
7 Fascination Street 5:15
8 Prayers for Rain 6:09
9 The Same Deep Water as You 9:21
10 Disintegration 8:23
11 Homesick 7:10
12 Untitled

Expanding the latent arena rock sensibilities that peppered Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me by slowing them down and stretching them to the breaking point, the Cure reached the peak of their popularity with the crawling, darkly seductive Disintegration. It's a hypnotic, mesmerizing record, comprised almost entirely of epics like the soaring, icy "Pictures of You." The handful of pop songs, like the concise and utterly charming "Love Song," don't alleviate the doom-laden atmosphere. The Cure's gloomy soundscapes have rarely sounded so alluring, however, and the songs -- from the pulsating, ominous "Fascination Street" to the eerie, string-laced "Lullaby" -- have rarely been so well-constructed and memorable. It's fitting that Disintegration was their commercial breakthrough, since, in many ways, the album is the culmination of all the musical directions the Cure were pursuing over the course of the '80s.


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The Beatles - Revolver (1966)

Postby sunrah » Thu Jul 31, 2008 12:32 pm

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1. Taxman
2. Eleanor Rigby
3. I'm Only Sleeping
4. Love You To
5. Here, There and Everywhere
6. Yellow Submarine
7. She Said, She Said
8. Good Day Sunshine
9. And Your Bird Can Sing
10. For No One
11. Doctor Robert
12. I Want to Tell You
13. Got to Get You into My Life
14. Tomorrow Never Knows

"I don't see too much difference between Revolver and Rubber Soul," George Harrison once said. "To me, they could be Volume One and Volume Two." Revolver extends the more adventurous aspects of its predecessor -- its introspection, its nascent psychedelia, its fascination with the possibilities of the studio -- into a dramatic statement of generational purpose. The album, which was released in August 1966, made it thrillingly clear that what we now think of as "the Sixties" was fully -- and irreversibly -- under way.

Part of that revolutionary impulse was visual. Klaus Voormann, one of the Beatles' artist buddies from their days in Hamburg, Germany, designed a striking photo-collage cover for Revolver; it was a crucial step on the road to the even trippier, more colorful imagery of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, which would come less than a year later.

And then there's the music. The most innovative track on the album is John Lennon's "Tomorrow Never Knows." Attempting to distill an LSD trip into a three-minute song, Lennon borrowed lyrics from Timothy Leary's version of The Tibetan Book of the Dead and recorded his vocal to sound like "the Dalai Lama singing from the highest mountaintop." Tape loops, a backward guitar part (Paul McCartney's blistering solo on "Taxman," in fact) and a droning tamboura completed the experimental effect, and the song proved hugely influential. For his part, on "Eleanor Rigby" and "For No One," McCartney mastered a strikingly mature form of art song, and Harrison, with "Taxman," "I Want to Tell You" and "Love You To," challenged Lennon-McCartney's songwriting dominance.

Revolver, finally, signaled that in popular music, anything -- any theme, any musical idea -- could now be realized. And, in th


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John Cage & Sun Ra - John Cage Meets Sun Ra (1987)

Postby sunrah » Wed Aug 06, 2008 12:37 pm

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*ATENTIE! SICK SIDE*

Sun Ra: various compositions or improvisations
John Cage: excerpts from Empty Words (part IV) (1974-75), read as interludes

Side 1: 21'23"
Side 2: 22'19"

Sun Ra improvising on the Yamaha DX7 synthesizer.
Empty Words IV performed by John Cage, voice.

Recorded live in concert: June 8, 1986 at Coney Island, N.Y.
LP released in 1987

These are unedited segments of the historic concert that was part of the "Sideshows by the Seashore" held on June 8, 1986 in Coney Island, NY. Improvisations and songs by Sun Ra and Cage's indeterminate performance vocals based on strict composition methods are contrasted and find a common meeting ground as, toward the end of the session, they play together. Fascinating and in genuine communal spirit.

"Modern classical composer John Cage and jazz maverick Sun Ra performed together in 1986 at Coney Island, New York. The result was recorded and released on this long out-of-print album. We are fortunate that Ubuweb is able to make this fascinating record available again.

Sun Ra begins with improvisations on the Yamaha DX7 synthesizer. John Cage performs his vocal work, Empty Words (Part IV), and each alternates performances. Cage’s performance is wonderfully trance-like with long silences as is typical of him. Sun Ra’s playing is other-worldly with little of the jazz quality that one hears in his Arkestra works. As a combined effort this “meeting” may not be very convincing. However if you consider each individual’s artistry, especially Sun Ra’s incredible sojourn at the synthesizer, you will find this a very rewarding experience. "


Summary: Strange, zany, and still at points incredible and amazing, John Cage and Sun Ra performed this concert in 1986. Sun Ra steals the show, improvising amazingly on his Yamaha synthesizer and simply mesmerizing anyone who hears the music.

For those who think Thom Yorke is weird, meet Sun Ra. Yes, this man calls himself Sun Ra. This isn’t a band name, this is a man. Although legally born Herman Poole Blount, Sun Ra took upon his persona after being nicknamed Sonny as a child. But his name isn’t even the weirdest part. The man claims to be of the “Angel Race” and from the planet Saturn. He’s so mysterious that people think his date of birth could be anywhere from 1910-1918. Sun Ra said his astrological sign was Gemini, but who knows if even he knows? Sun Ra, of course, was a musician. He performed free jazz, known for his piano and synthesizer skill. He sounds like no other piano or synthesizer player and makes Miles Davis’ experimentation look like Lawrence Welk swing. Critics call his technique “a variety of influences, including blues, Count Basie's bounce, Thelonious Monk's dissonance and a degree of European impressionism.”

John Cage isn’t exactly all that normal either. He has a bit more of a revered background, studying music at the Cornish School of the Arts. However, the formal studying never got to his head. He created some of the most unique and contemporary music of the 20th century. On top of creating a musical piece for twelve radio receivers and music for an ensemble of metal percussive instruments, Cage made countless pieces of music based on the theory of “chance music.” In the score, Cage wrote silence in his music, however, he knew that at a live performance no such silence would occur. The sound in the performance venue becomes the music. He even wrote his most famous piece based on this theory, 4’33”, a 4 minute 33 second song divided into 3 movements of written silence. Not a single note.

These facts about these two men are essential to understanding this live performance. Without this information, the 45 minute performance seems terribly odd and zany. Sun Ra’s spastic, heavy synthesizer matched with Cage’s minimalist, sparse vocal noises seem all too much for a stable, sane human mind. On this recording, there are literally minutes of absolutely no music going on at the time. Cage showcases his “chance music” theory on this live recording, and the crowd apparently knows his ideas well. However, the recording quality diminishes from the chance music theory. Either the crowd kept incredibly silent or the recording did not pick up the sounds coming from the crowd. Overall, the recording quality of the performance is quite poor, often sounding like an old 50s movie.

Due to variety and musicality, Sun Ra heavily defeats John Cage on the performance. He opens the concert with a huge, furious, dissonant keyboard performance. The crowd cheers wildly and the spacey synthesizer sounds jump all around the range of the instrument and jump around in styles just as quickly. Elements of jazz flow in and suddenly a huge, orchestral sounding chord will overpower the recording instrument. The synth voices change frequently from a typical square lead voice to a bell sound to a synthesized voice. Sun Ra uses his range of voices perfectly, creating a heavy, metallic sound at some points which makes an even more frenzied sound to the already insane harmonic structure. He manages to jump from the most beautiful chords to the most dissonance in a matter of seconds. His first appearance goes on for 7 and a half minutes, garnering tumultuous applause from the audience. He later closes out the first half of the performance with a much more eastern tinged movement. Just when his playing couldn’t get any darker, he spends most of the second half making ambient, creepy noises. Much in the manner of the Mars Volta, he goes off without any sense of time or rhythm, creating whatever comes to mind. However, he lets the ambience slowly build into huge, crashing chords of either beauty or dissonance. Everything is going somewhere.

John Cage is just the opposite. His performance is much simpler. He merely steps up to a microphone and makes strange vocal noises. Cage’s voice sounds akin to an aging Johnny Cash. However, Cage never steps over saying more than 3 or 4 syllables at a time. He takes minute breaks before starting another few indistinguishable syllables. Of course, he relies on his “chance music” theory to get away with the minutes of silence. Sure, it’s a profound and intriguing idea, but it just gets old after a few minutes, especially when the recording buzzes in the background due to the quality. In truth, Cage is reciting excerpts from one of his poems in some strange language, known as Empty Words IV. However, who knows what he is saying? Luckily, Sun Ra saves the performance on the second half by filling in where Cage leaves silence. He fills with light, dainty keyboard lines way up high on the keys. He lets Cage have the show, not doing much of anything, but neither Cage still does less than Sun Ra. Cage proves a better composer and philosopher than a performer. Regardless, the crowd eats everything up, probably being mostly young, profound college kids themselves.

Knowing the stories and ideas of these two men, the performance of this album is almost the sonic equivalent of their lives. Sun Ra shows off his zany, spaced out mind. His music sounds like it’s from another planet, a royal proclamation from Saturn. Conversely, John Cage shows his independent, introspective self with his Empty Words IV literature and extended periods of silence. The two together form a compilation of some of the strangest, weirdest, and somehow profound music of all time. Both men being underappreciated and extremely important 20th century innovators, they never worry about fans or appeal like so many other artists. The two men show a love for music, ideas, and the profound relationship between them.


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Postby sunrah » Fri Aug 08, 2008 11:07 pm

pentru ca tot ne place batmanul nou:

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1. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batman Theme (2:17)
2. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batman's Batmorang (2:51)
3. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batman and Robin over the Roofs (6:50)
4. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - The Penguin Chase (2:43)
5. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Flight of the Batman (2:09)
6. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Joker is Wild (1:53)
7. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Robin's Theme (3:05)
8. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Penguin's Umbrella (3:05)
9. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batman and Robin Swing (2:42)
10. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batmobile Wheels (2:01)
11. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - The Riddler's Retreat (2:12)
12. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - The Bat Cave (2:47)

ideea a fost doar una vizuala, nimic mai mult.
chiar si asa, nu va fie frica, e funky, fara syntetizatoare ori electronice. :lol:

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Postby NskY » Sat Aug 09, 2008 12:26 am

Sun|Rah wrote:pentru ca tot ne place batmanul nou:

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1. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batman Theme (2:17)
2. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batman's Batmorang (2:51)
3. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batman and Robin over the Roofs (6:50)
4. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - The Penguin Chase (2:43)
5. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Flight of the Batman (2:09)
6. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Joker is Wild (1:53)
7. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Robin's Theme (3:05)
8. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Penguin's Umbrella (3:05)
9. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batman and Robin Swing (2:42)
10. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - Batmobile Wheels (2:01)
11. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - The Riddler's Retreat (2:12)
12. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - The Bat Cave (2:47)

ideea a fost doar una vizuala, nimic mai mult.
chiar si asa, nu va fie frica, e funky, fara syntetizatoare ori electronice. :lol:

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destul de dragutz. piesa preferata 11. Sun Ra and the Blues Project - The Riddler's Retreat 8)
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Postby NskY » Sat Aug 09, 2008 12:49 am

hai ca am zis sa pun si eu un album care imi place, desi o sa fie downloadat de maxim 5 persoane. pe mine ma atinge asa. :D

Judy Collins - Home Again [1984]
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Serge Gainsbourg - Histoire de Melody Nelson (1971)

Postby sunrah » Sat Aug 09, 2008 1:59 pm

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Genre: French Pop

1 Melody 7:32
2 Ballade de Melody Nelson 2:00
3 Valse de Melody 1:31
4 Ah! Melody 1:47
5 L'Hotel particulier 4:05
6 En Melody 3:25
7 Cargo Culte 7:37

You don't need to speak a word of French to understand Histoire de Melody Nelson — one needs only to look at the front cover (with its nearly pornographic portrait of a half-naked nymphet clutching a rag doll) or hear the lechery virtually dripping from Serge Gainsbourg's sleazily seductive voice to realize that this is the record your mother always warned you about, a masterpiece of perversion and corruption. A concept record exploring the story of — and Gainsbourg's lust for — the titular teen heroine, Histoire de Melody Nelson is arguably his most coherent and perfectly realized studio album, with the lush arrangements which characterize the majority of his work often mixed here with funky rhythm lines which underscore the musky allure of the music. Perhaps best described as a dirty old bastard's attempt to make his own R&B love-man's record along the lines of a Let's Get It On (itself still two years away from release), it's by turns fascinating and repellent, hilarious and grim, but never dull — which, in Gainsbourg's world, would be the ultimate (and quite possibly the only) sin.


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The Specials - Specials (1979)

Postby sunrah » Sat Aug 09, 2008 2:41 pm

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Genre: Ska

1 A Message to You Rudy 2:53
2 Do the Dog 2:11
3 Gangsters 2:46
4 It's Up to You 3:25
5 Nite Klub 3:24
6 Doesn't Make It Alright 3:26
7 Concrete Jungle 3:21
8 Too Hot 3:11
9 Monkey Man 2:45
10 (Dawning of a) New Era 2:27
11 Blank Expression 2:44
12 Stupid Marriage 3:51
13 Too Much Too Young 2:16
14 Little Bitch 2:33
15 You're Wondering Now 2:37

A perfect moment in time captured on vinyl forever, such is the Specials' eponymous debut album; it arrived in shops in the middle of October 1979 and soared into the U.K. Top Five. It was an utter revelation — except for anyone who had seen the band on-stage, for the album was at its core a studio recording of their live set, and at times even masquerades as a gig. There were some notable omissions: "Gangsters," for one, but that had already spun on 45, as well as the quartet of covers that would appear on their live Too Much Too Young EP in the new year. But the rest are all here, 14 songs' strong, mostly originals with a few covers of classics thrown in for good measure. That includes their fabulous take on Dandy Livingstone's "A Message to You Rudy," an equally stellar version of the Maytals' "Monkey Man," and the sizzling take on Prince Buster's "Too Hot." If those were fabulous, their own compositions were magnificent. The Specials managed to distill all the anger, disenchantment, and bitterness of the day straight into their music. The vicious "Nite Klub" — with its unforgettable line, "All the girls are slags and the beer tastes just like piss" — perfectly skewered every bad night the members had ever spent out on the town; "Blank Expression" extended the misery into unwelcoming pubs, while "Concrete Jungle" moved the action onto the streets, capturing the fear and violence that stalked the inner cities. And then it gets personal. "It's Up to You" throws down the gauntlets to those who disliked the group, its music, and its stance, while simultaneously acting as a rallying cry for supporters. "Too Much Too Young" shows the Specials' disdain for teen pregnancy and marriage; "Stupid Marriage" drags two such offenders before a Judge Dread-esque magistrate, with Terry Hall playing the outraged and sniping prosecutor; while "Little Bitch" is downright nasty. Those were polemics; "It Doesn't Make It Alright" reaches a hand out to listeners and, with conviction, delivers up a heartfelt plea against racism, but even this number contains a sharp sting in its tail. It's a bitter brew, aggressively delivered, with even the slower numbers sharply edged, and therefore the band wisely scattered sparkling covers across the album to help lift its mood. The set appropriately ends with the rocksteady-esque yearning of "You're Wondering Now," the song that invariably closed their live shows. Even though producer Elvis Costello gave the record a bright sound, it doesn't lighten the dark currents that run through the group's songs; if anything, his production heightens them. It's left to guests Rico Rodriguez and Dick Cuthell to provide a little Caribbean sun to the Specials' sound, their brass sweetening the flashes of anger and disaffection that sweep across the record. And so, this was Britain in late 1979, an unhappy island about to explode.


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